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What Accomplished People Can Teach You About Work-Life Balance


13 Comments
Stumbled on the article at businessweek.com called Readers Voice Their Workplace Problems. It discusses workplace problems identifying work-life balance (WLB) as #1 issue. I am all for WLB and I am constantly looking for a ways to improve. Look what other accomplished people can teach you about practical approach for load at home and at work. work life balance
by cpt.spock
This is what they say:


Angelica Menefee, Founder and president of Trampoline, Inc.

I think you have to have a lot of self-discipline

Roger Howard, Head of shipping department, data processing company.

I’ve always been a reader, but I read a lot more now. It’s relaxing. It gives you an avenue to direct yourself in.

Michael Jones, Part-time consultant for Six Sigma, Gulf Shores.

I decided to get into consulting because I’d been working too many hours. I have a lot more control over what I do, and I sleep better.

Lisa Blanton, Founder and president of the Collings Group.

Work-life balance has become less difficult since I became my own boss. That was the only way to really manage it.

LaMonte Guillory, Internet business strategist

I even talk about my personal life in business fashion—so we could bring some balance to our work-personal life

Lou Hoffmann, Founder and president of the Hoffman Agency

The key is having more control of your time and how you control your job

Practice This – Get Results

What’re your secrets of healthy work-life balance?

13 March 2009

13 Comments »

  • Liara Covert said:

    Alik, some human beings believe that every person they encounter or focus on is actually mirroring things back about them. Regardless of what you observe or admire about other people, the key is to learn what it means to turn inward and reconnect with your core self.

  • Sheila Atwood said:

    Thinking about moving to the farm where work and home are the same thing…live on a farm OH MY!

    It seems like there are more and more demands for our attention and it is starting at a younger and younger age. I remember that a leisure class became a required course when I was in high school. (a long time ago).

    Kids are coming home from school with hours of home work. What happened to time for play, music lessons and family. Last week my niece went to her third grade sons teacher and told the teacher that they would not be doing hours of home work. They would be focusing on his reading on his reading only. Good for her! Her boy takes music lessons, has a little job and does his chores after school and still has time to be a kid with his buds. Those opportunities are not offered at the school.

    It is no wonder we have an idea we are entitled to things we have not worked for. Work is creating its own bum rap.

    Sheila

  • J.D. Meier said:

    Schedule it.

    Scheduling seems to be the most effective way I’ve found so far.

  • Giovanna Garcia said:

    Hi Alik

    I am with J.D. on this one Schedule is the key to ensure balance.
    Thanks,
    Giovanna Garcia
    Imperfect Action is better than No Action

  • alik levin (author) said:

    Liara,
    People mirror things about me… – I like it! Looking into others to find myself.

    Sheila,
    Being on farm is like being an Information Worker like myself. I carry my laptop everywhere – at work and home. Separating work and personal stuff is only matter of strict discipline which is not that easy for me
    ;)

    JD and Giovanna,
    I am with you 100% + discipline. Good schedule only won’t do the trick, someone needs to stick w/it. And that is the hardest part for me – I am my biggest distraction ;)

  • tom said:

    Self discipline is very important but other things I noticed is having a purpose to achieve that balance.

    What has worked for me is seeing the mistakes of others and committing yourself to never do that.

    Its like one of those, you experience the bad stuff before you learn to appreciate and strive for the better.

    Too bad many people just live a half-assed life, just getting back, waiting for the weekend so they can get trashed and the cycle repeats.

  • alik levin (author) said:

    tom,
    Learn from mistakes in action, eh? ;)

  • tom said:

    Well ya learning from your mistakes but also learning from mistakes other have made.
    Mistakes costs time, money and opportunity so we can’t be going around screwing up purposely but also we can’t go around not trying anything.

    There is a fine balance.

  • Jannie Funster said:

    Patricia of Patricia’s Wisdom..

    http://www.patriciaswisdom.com

    recently turned me onto YES! magazine.

    Have you read the following article?? On 10 Things Scientist Know Will Make You Happy?

    http://www.yesmagazine.org/article.asp?id=3022

    I love how they say how taking initiative at work will make you happier. I just love the whole article. I’m so happy now, having read it!

  • Gennaro said:

    If possible, do something that you love doing and try to incorporate your loved ones. That cuts down on the issue. If not, I’d go with setting up a schedule to ensure that the “life” part is met. Too much work will ruin your relationships.

  • alik levin (author) said:

    Jannie,
    Good article! Loved #2 “Avoid comparisons”. Actually I am big fan of comparisons… with a twist. I compare myself w/me – “am I better than me? What can do to be better than me?” ;)

    Gennaro,
    Gold. “Life” is part of my life ;), must consciously make room for it. Good stuff!

  • Tess The Bold Life said:

    When I worked full time I made sure my work was balanced with good friends, laughter and fun.

    If there wasn’t time for fun I would have my fun at work.
    When was first out of grad school my first job was at an agency for drug addiction.

    My friend Patti and I had offices in the basement with no windows or heat. It was so cold we had space heaters and wore our winter coats at times in the winter.

    We had an over load of paper work and clients.

    But we had a great time. Often we would be laughing so hard the people on the first floor would stomp their feet to let us know they could here us.

    I had more fun with that job than any other since. Years later we are still friends and it all began when we were handed lemons and made lemonade.

  • alik levin (author) said:

    Tess,
    Very nice story you shared here. It only proves once more having fun is crucial for personal success at work and in life. No passion, no fun, no success. So how do you cope with mandatory tedious work? Ahhh… you make lemonade, got it! ;)
    Thank you for sharing this personal story – I am a big fan of stories from trenches ;)

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